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Ipoh

Fried wanton Ipoh hor fun, S$3.00.

This stall was a serendipitous find that’s surprisingly good! We were here to grab a quick meal and were wondering what to eat when I spied some tables having these irresistible-looking fried wantons and Ipoh hor fun.

My hunch was right! The golden, crispy wantons were delicious! Instead of minced pork, they were stuffed with a bouncy paste of minced fish and chicken. Tastier and smoother than the conventional pork version!

The wanton skins were very light and crispy, and stayed that way right to the end. Absolutely more-ish, impossible to stop at one! Lucky they were generous with the wantons!

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Shredded chicken Ipoh hor fun, S$3.00.

Besides fried wantons, there are other toppings to choose from, like the more familiar shredded chicken wanton. No points for presentation, but the rice noodles were sufficiently silky, and the stewed mushrooms flavorful.

I also liked that the gravy here was pleasantly light and tasty, without being too starchy. I even spied wolfberries (goji berries) in it. How homey and generous! The stall owners here are also generous with the portions.

We also tried the “phoenix claws” hor fun, but the chicken feet hadn’t been simmered long enough to acquire that tender, “fall-apart” texture. For me, I’m sticking to the fried wantons, which are also available a la carte for those who can’t get enough of them.

Ah Liang Ipoh Hor Fun
450 Clementi Avenue 3
#01-271, Kopitiam (corner coffeeshop next to Clementi MRT)
Singapore 120450

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4 Responses to “Ah Liang Ipoh Hor Fun”

  1. Christy says:

    Wow…first time I spot wolfberries in a bowl of hor fun!~
    And the veggies look really good as well:)
    You take really good photos!~

  2. WEIHONG says:

    Eaten here a few times before, totally agree with Julia’s review. The gravy is super !

  3. hazel says:

    This Asian noodle, which is more popularly eaten in South-east Asia, comes in a few variations. The Cantonese-style hor fun comes in wide ribbons and is more suited for stir-frying. Its Teochew cousin is the kway teow, which is smaller in width. The Thai rice stick and Vietnamese ban pho are even narrower and thinner than their Chinese counterparts.
    ——————————
    hazel
    Guaranteed ROI

  4. ice says:

    Hey Julia! I just discovered Ah Liang’s a chain of some sorts. There’s one at my doorstep Jurong East Central but I never took notice till I saw the familiar red plate yesterday! :)